Educators educating Educators

Sep 26

Famous People ADHD



Famous people with AD/HD, Dyslexia, or Learning Differences:

Find out who was labeled as slow or different and overcame their obstacles to become successful in their fields.

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Famous person video

Watch the YouTube video (7:52) below of diversely prominent people who overcame their learning differences to become eminent in their fields.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhsBZuo_9yw

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As a child he was labeled slow, clerked in a village grocery store, and suggested putting slow-moving merchandise on a counter and selling it for five cents.

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He learns his lines by listening to tapes, suffers from dyslexia, and memorized all of his lines for his first hit movie Top Gun.

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Diagnosed functionally illiterate age 12, chronic stutterer until he was 20, nicknamed Pickles because of his immense forehead, CBS Emmy-Winning Journalist, and a “60 minutes” host.

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He has soft spot for underdogs, partly because he was one himself. "I knew what it was like to have my feelings hurt. Those classes made you feel bad about yourself." A self-described "class clown," he used his popularity to ensure the other special-education kids were included in activities.
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He was spanked by his teachers for his bad grades and a poor attitude and dropped out of school at 16. He has a wickedly unreliable memory, his mind goes blank at the most inopportune times, writes important things (like names) in black ink on the back of his hand, confuses gross profit with net profit, and is terrible at math and won’t use a computer.

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He was a D-minus student who had already flunked two grades. He suffered from both dyslexia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), making it hard for him to sit still in a classroom, and had even been expelled from several schools as a result.

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News

Welcome back to another school year. I hope your summer was relaxing and invigorating and you are looking forward to the approaching school year and the opportunity to stimulate and challenge your students’ minds.

This summer I was able to study Sir Ken Robinson, a British author, speaker and international advisor on education to governments, non-profits, and education organizations

I, like many people, find his writings and Ted Talks not only witty and inspiring but also thought-provoking and challenging. Much of his work deals with the diversity of intelligence, the power of imagination and creativity, and the importance of commitment to our own capabilities. He posits that the noticeable lack of them in our schools negatively affect students’ learning and teachers’ productivity and the absence of them is triggered by the demands of standardized testing.

I hope you find Sir Ken Robinson’s words inspiriting and challenging as I do and be mindful of them as you plan for the new year. Here is to a great 2017-2018 school year!